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  • Not including the screw-on aluminum feet, the L7 is 1175mm tall. The A5.4 has a 1000mm cabinet, for reference. The L7 is therefore nearly 6" taller, which puts the tweeters at roughly the same distance from the floor. Add a couple of inches for each to include the feet.

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    • Originally posted by Chane M&C View Post
      Not including the screw-on aluminum feet, the L7 is 1175mm tall. The A5.4 has a 1000mm cabinet, for reference. The L7 is therefore nearly 6" taller, which puts the tweeters at roughly the same distance from the floor. Add a couple of inches for each to include the feet.
      So about 4 feet tall with the feet for us non metric folks. I also see a round cutout for the tweeter. Does this mean you are going away from the planer for the L series?

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      • Originally posted by 1st Time Caller View Post
        So about 4 feet tall with the feet for us non metric folks. I also see a round cutout for the tweeter. Does this mean you are going away from the planer for the L series?
        Yes, 46.25" plus the feet so close to four feet all in.

        Concerning drivers let's first note that there are roughly four speaker design groups or levels, meaning four design goals that are brought out before drivers are even factored. The top two are almost non-existent and when they do appear tend to cost a great deal. The third is where the A series lies, and the fourth is where just about all the "standard school" product - appliance store models, Big Brand models, and most any popular, distributed, known brand - is concerned. (You could include a fifth level of haphazard design but since it's mostly just twisting parts together whether by ear or a mike we can ignore it).

        The A series does not share a lot of elements with that standard school. Chane is aware of them and we even emulate some, but the A series is where we start to throw the book away and based on user response, apparently for good reason. The L series then rises a level above and this is where drivers come back into play.

        A main component of better, more transparent-sounding design are the raw drivers' responses. If we aim to accomplish X, for example, we consciously need a driver whose response is suited for it. The A series uses the planar to great benefit but it alone cannot constitute the sound of the speaker it's in. The design accounts for that. The biggest advantage the planar has is its robustness - it plays exceptionally well with the powerful SplitGap midbasses in the heart of the speaker. Covering only a few octaves, tweeters are basically just overtone generators so they only complete the rest of the design and that design most informs the speaker and its sound.

        The L series simply seeks a different design level and to get it we need a treble driver with some fundamentally important behaviors. We know the driver isn't going to give us the speaker's sound but the design type shall and that design type dictated our driver choices.

        This is why the L series is exciting: It moves away from the usual, pragmatic goals and toward some of the more interesting, beneficial ones. To get there we just adjust the driver "maps", spend more on their raw tech, and take at least as much care in the final setup and tune as we have in the past.

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        • Just Stopping By

          Hello Jon,
          Thought I would stop by and just say hello my old Friend, not insinuating you're old just that we've known each other for a long time, I'm getting older as we speak. :) Kind of got caught up with what's going on with the L7 & 6, I thought this project would be old news by now and I could get in on the second gen model(s)..........;)

          It sounds like exciting times are back and it feels like the old days while waiting for the original A series to finally arrive, the wait was again worth it. I can't believe it's been that long ago, seems like yesterday except I'm about seven years older, I'd really like to audition a pair of the L7s while I still have decent hearing.......I know you're doing all you can to make that happen.

          OK my friend, I'll be checking in here periodically for any updates, glad I stopped by today..........also a shout out to my old buddy Collin, hope all is well my friend. :)

          Cheers Jeffrey

          Comment


          • Originally posted by jnordi View Post
            Thought I would stop by and just say hello my old Friend...
            Great to hear from you, Jeffrey. I was thinking about you recently - what are you listening to lately, if I can ask?

            Really good to see you here again. I hope we can stay in touch.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Chane M&C View Post
              Renderings of the L7 in two finishes.
              • 4x 6.5" midwoofers
              • 2x 4.5" midrange drivers
              • MTM mid-high configuration
              • Design prioritizes transient response


              [ATTACH]15422[/ATTACH]
              I'm impressed with the box design and that the entire front baffle is used for driver space, very nice indeed.........:)

              Jeffrey

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              • Those L7's look sweet I must admit. Are they imposing on speakers like the Aperion Verus II Line? Although... those have a maximum driver count of 5. 2 mids and 2 woofers, 1 tweeter but they are sexy and have been reviewed very well but are NOT cheap by any means.

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                • Originally posted by alphazoom View Post
                  Those L7's look sweet I must admit. Are they imposing on speakers like the Aperion Verus II Line? Although... those have a maximum driver count of 5. 2 mids and 2 woofers, 1 tweeter but they are sexy and have been reviewed very well but are NOT cheap by any means.
                  They're about half a foot taller than the A5 and all that driven area makes them powerful.

                  I'd like to position the L line as though it were a premium, big-branded retail store line but styled a little simpler while using very good driver and design tech. Internet-direct should make them excellent values and I hope the WAF makes them a room-friendly alternative too.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Chane M&C View Post
                    Great to hear from you, Jeffrey. I was thinking about you recently - what are you listening to lately, if I can ask?

                    Really good to see you here again. I hope we can stay in touch.
                    Same here Jon, I think of you often, especially our many talks about the state of audio as we know it now....Likewise, I'll be in touch as well. I've been through a few commercial ID brands (loudspeaker systems) over the years and decided about 2-3 years ago to try the DIY route.

                    My front stage (LCR) are identical 1099s with the bamboo (cabs) finish, a three way ported design (dual 10" woofers) with a sealed mid chamber housing the two mid and CD loaded WG drivers. I didn't trust myself with finishing the boxes nor did I have the patience to undertake that endeavor so I had a cabinet maker do that for me. Since I wasn't putting them behind a screen they had to look as good as they sound, I think they do......

                    I have Volt 8" coaxs for surround duties and am building my four Volt 6" coaxs for Atmos as we speak, so yes you can ask what I'm listening to lately.......the low end for now is handled by two commercial subwoofers, the PSA S3601s....

                    I'm really looking forward to seeing what you have up your sleeve with the other offerings mentioned along with the L7 and 6, will be staying in touch my friend.............:)

                    Cheers Jeffrey

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by jnordi View Post
                      My front stage (LCR) are identical 1099s with the bamboo (cabs) finish, a three way ported design (dual 10" woofers) with a sealed mid chamber housing the two mid and CD loaded WG drivers.
                      You've been bitten by the high energy bug, Jeffrey. It can be compelling; I've always said that there's nothing to avoid more than a bad horn system and nothing better to listen to than a great horn system. When they're right, they're really right. Some can be simply transcendent - like hearing nothing at all.

                      Originally posted by jnordi View Post
                      I'm really looking forward to seeing what you have up your sleeve with the other offerings mentioned along with the L7 and 6, will be staying in touch my friend.
                      We may want to talk offline. I think I owe you a disclosure. ;)

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Chane M&C View Post
                        Thanks for the interest, bkeeler. The driver tech is kinda huge and I can't wait to share all the details...
                        That is interesting. One of my biggest audio purchases that was kind of a bust was a Paradigm Audio CC-690 which I wanted to sound huge, but it didn't. I'm not sure if the single 4.5" driver was at fault or it was a dipsersion issue, or many other things could be at issue like crossover and efficiency of the driver ( no reason 4.5" can't get ridiculously loud!). Are the drivers in use up to supporting 4 larger dirvers?

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Lanion View Post
                          That is interesting. One of my biggest audio purchases that was kind of a bust was a Paradigm Audio CC-690 which I wanted to sound huge, but it didn't. I'm not sure if the single 4.5" driver was at fault or it was a dispersion issue, or many other things could be at issue like crossover and efficiency of the driver ( no reason 4.5" can't get ridiculously loud!). Are the drivers in use up to supporting 4 larger drivers?
                          I've become quite convinced that in any one general acoustical size class, whether a 5" 2-way bookshelf system or a 4-way horn rig with a huge bass driver or anything in between, the crossover is the key to big sound. More correctly, it's the key to dynamic freedom, as another commenter here said recently.

                          Getting the speaker out of its own way and allowing the system, led by the source recording, to really bloom and emerge in real 3D acoustical space is contingent on the effectiveness of the design goal. A good design goal insists that the wavefronts emerge as as close to a single coherent shape as possible and that calls for as much coordination as we can get across all three domains.

                          Get that right and even relatively tiny speakers suddenly sound two classes larger. Get it right in a very large and very low distortion speaker and that speaker just ceases to be. It becomes invisible, or close enough to invisible to make little difference. There the recording almost completely takes center stage. The speaker simply pressurizes the space enough like the microphone originally heard* that you can forget it. Fatigue vanishes.

                          Really gonzo audiophiles - who seem to have little use for textbook linearity - refer to connectedness. I'd call it an overwhelming sense of sophistication. Either way, it's that inescapable feeling that whatever it is that's going on it's piped right from the original event and that original event, as such, is a lot more sophisticated than the average consumer speaker makes it appear to be.

                          Whether or not that effect is substantially possible in a direct radiating speaker or really, any speaker under mid five figures is up for debate. Regardless, it's a good goal and you can get pieces of it from fairly modest systems.

                          To answer your question, in the L7 (and L6) the twin 4.5" midranges, aside from being really good drivers, are aligned with the tweeter to create a nicely homogeneous source. They are then limited to a range in which their combined outputs are quite comfortable across the speaker's entire dynamic range. They become that potentially large-sounding subsystem you alluded to.

                          From the there four 6.5" drivers aren't so much chosen for enormous volume levels as they are, somewhat like the three-driver A5, combined into a fair amount of area because it's area that factors in the fundamental distortion equation. The end result is a speaker that, also like the A5, has a nice reserve to it. The MTM at the top carries most of the speaker's spatial personality and the four 6.5"s below it give the speaker dynamic ease.

                          *...which is why really good analog works so well. It's not about the technical or intellectual arguments about recording methods; it's completely about the adequate suspension of disbelief we can get from what is actually waveform-for-waveform reproduction generated by an acoustical time machine...

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Chane M&C View Post
                            I've become quite convinced that in any one general acoustical size class, whether a 5" 2-way bookshelf system or a 4-way horn rig with a huge bass driver or anything in between, the crossover is the key to big sound. More correctly, it's the key to dynamic freedom, as another commenter here said recently.

                            Getting the speaker out of its own way and allowing the system, led by the source recording, to really bloom and emerge in real 3D acoustical space is contingent on the effectiveness of the design goal. A good design goal insists that the wavefronts emerge as as close to a single coherent shape as possible and that calls for as much coordination as we can get across all three domains.

                            Get that right and even relatively tiny speakers suddenly sound two classes larger. Get it right in a very large and very low distortion speaker and that speaker just ceases to be. It becomes invisible, or close enough to invisible to make little difference. There the recording almost completely takes center stage. The speaker simply pressurizes the space enough like the microphone originally heard* that you can forget it. Fatigue vanishes.

                            Really gonzo audiophiles - who seem to have little use for textbook linearity - refer to connectedness. I'd call it an overwhelming sense of sophistication. Either way, it's that inescapable feeling that whatever it is that's going on it's piped right from the original event and that original event, as such, is a lot more sophisticated than the average consumer speaker makes it appear to be.

                            Whether or not that effect is substantially possible in a direct radiating speaker or really, any speaker under mid five figures is up for debate. Regardless, it's a good goal and you can get pieces of it from fairly modest systems.

                            To answer your question, in the L7 (and L6) the twin 4.5" midranges, aside from being really good drivers, are aligned with the tweeter to create a nicely homogeneous source. They are then limited to a range in which their combined outputs are quite comfortable across the speaker's entire dynamic range. They become that potentially large-sounding subsystem you alluded to.

                            From the there four 6.5" drivers aren't so much chosen for enormous volume levels as they are, somewhat like the three-driver A5, combined into a fair amount of area because it's area that factors in the fundamental distortion equation. The end result is a speaker that, also like the A5, has a nice reserve to it. The MTM at the top carries most of the speaker's spatial personality and the four 6.5"s below it give the speaker dynamic ease.

                            *...which is why really good analog works so well. It's not about the technical or intellectual arguments about recording methods; it's completely about the adequate suspension of disbelief we can get from what is actually waveform-for-waveform reproduction generated by an acoustical time machine...
                            Thanks. I really didn't think enough before writing that -- as I *have* some speakers with small drivers that sound pretty great. I really was just disappointed in that one center channel I think. Also, I should stop using the word 'loud' when I mean something other than db... ha.

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                            • Originally posted by Lanion View Post
                              Thanks. I really didn't think enough before writing that -- as I *have* some speakers with small drivers that sound pretty great. I really was just disappointed in that one center channel I think. Also, I should stop using the word 'loud' when I mean something other than db... ha.
                              I liked your comment because it gave an opportunity to sound off about something that may not get enough attention in conventional wisdom circles. We naturally tend to think specific drivers dominate a speaker's sound - the tweeter, for example - when it's really the complete design and its tuning that we hear. Thanks for your thoughts. Very observant.

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                              • Jon

                                I know its early but have you found in your testing if the l7's need to be out in the room or can they be a foot or two from the wall?

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